August 28, 2016

LeslieChristen.com

No more of this Blogging blogidy blog stuff.  My business has never been more successful, so I thought I would spring for a grown up website and it's going to be so pretty. I am currently traveling with my Son's Non-profit Play Well Africa (Check it out!!) So the process is a bit incomplete, kind of like this image of me below, but it will up soon and you know I'll let you know through all my social media channels as soon as it's live.
Love to you all for your continued support, it means so much to me. Stay stylish!

Leslie Christen OC Fashion Stylist, Orange County Fashion Stylist, Orange County Personal Shopper, Personal Shopper OC, Closet organizer In Orange County, Personal Shopper Orange County, Orange County Personal Shopping, Orange County Personal Stylist, Organizer, Personal Shopper, Personal Stylist, Orange County Stylist, Personal Stylist OC,  Leslie Christen LA Fashion Stylist, Los Angeles Fashion Stylist, Los Angeles Personal Shopper, Personal Shopper LA, Closet organizer In Los Angeles, Personal Shopper Los Angeles, Orange County Organizer, Personal Stylist LA, Personal Stylist Leslie Christen, Personal Shopper Leslie Christen, Stylist Leslie Christen, Leslie Christen, LifeStyling, Styling your life, Your life, Styled,  Leslie Christen Press, Leslie Christen, OC Style Classes, OC Style, OC Edit, OC Organize, OC Wear, Best oc Stylist, best boutiques in OC, best boutiques in Orange County, what to wear oc, where to buy oc, best blog in oc, Best fashion blog in oc, Best blogger in OC, Fashion Stylist Laguna Beach, Fashion Stylist Newport Beach, Fashion Stylist Corona Del Mar, Fashion Stylist Newport Coast




May 25, 2016

Style For Hire

While traveling this summer I'll be shooting unique editorials for local brands all over the world. If you're looking to get your product shot in exciting global places let me know! Style@LeslieChristen.com

May 14, 2016

8 Reasons Successful People Are Choosing to Wear the Same Thing Every Day

As a fashion stylist who believes less is more and better is best, this article reinforces what I tell my clients everyday - adopt minimalist principles to your wardrobe choices and discover more productivity, less stress, less distraction, less expense and more peace.

The capsule wardrobe movement continues to gain momentum.

Fast fashion deserves criticism. And our culture’s obsession with ever-changing fashion trends is an artificial pursuit manufactured by those who benefit from it.

The capsule wardrobe movement is far from mainstream. But, elevated in the social consciousness by some high-profile personalities, more and more people are applying minimalist principles to their fashion.

Many people outside the movement remain skeptical. They wonder why anybody would intentionally choose to wear the same outfit every day—especially when financial resources are not in question.

Evaluating my personal experience with a minimal wardrobe and studying recent profiles in various publications, I have created this list of reasons.

If you have ever wondered why some successful people choose to wear the same outfit everyday, or better yet, if you are considering adopting a more streamlined wardrobe yourself, here are 8 convincing reasons:

1. Fewer decisions. Decision fatigue refers to the deteriorating quality of decisions made by an individual after a long session of decision making. For people who make significant decisions every day, the removal of even one—choosing clothes in the morning—leaves them with more mental space and better productivity throughout the day.

This forms the basis for President Barack Obama’s limited fashion options, “You’ll see I wear only gray or blue suits. I’m trying to pare down decisions. I don’t want to make decisions about what I’m eating or wearing. Because I have too many other decisions to make.” Mark Zuckerberg cites similar rationale. One less frivolous decision in the morning leads to better decisions on things that really matter.

2. Less time wasted. We have no idea how much of a burden our possessions have become until we begin to remove them. But when we do, we immediately discover a new life of freedom and opportunity. It was almost five years ago that I first experimented with Project 333—a personal challenge of wearing only 33 articles of clothing for a period of 3 months. The project is simple, life-changing, and wildly beneficial. I quickly discovered one of the greatest benefits of limiting my wardrobe: the gift of time. Getting ready in the morning became easier, quicker, and more efficient.

3. Less stress. Matilda Kahl, an art director in New York cites both decision fatigue and less time getting ready as her reason for wearing the same outfit everyday. But she adds another: less stress—specifically, less stress during the day over the decision she originally made in the morning. “Is this too formal? Is that too out there? Is this dress too short? Almost always, I’d choose something to wear I regretted as soon as I hit the subway platform.” But now, in her trademark silk white shirt and black trousers, she has one less source of anxiety during the day.

4. Less wasted energy. Christopher Nolan has created several of the most critically and commercially successful films of the early 21st century. But, according to New York Times Magazine, he decided long ago it was “a waste of energy to choose anew what to wear each day.” Now, he settles instead for a dark, narrow-lapeled jacket over a blue dress shirt with black trousers over sensible shoes to wear each day.

Christopher offers an important distinction when he refers to “wasted energy.” Not only do large wardrobes require more decision-making, they also require more maintenance, more organization, and more shuffling around. Additionally, while a capsule wardrobe may not result in less laundry, it does result in both easier laundry and storage.

5. Feeling put together. Denaye Barahona is a young mother in Dallas, TX. This spring, she exchanged her full, disorganized closet for a minimal wardrobe of versatile pieces she loves to wear. She summarizes the difference like this, “Pre-capsule, my wardrobe was like the Cheesecake Factory menu. It went on for days and was overwhelming. Most of my options didn’t fit right, didn’t look right, or I just plain didn’t like. On the other hand, my capsule wardrobe is like a fine-dining restaurant. I have fewer choices but I can be sure all of the choices will be amazing. Not only do I look better, I feel better.”

Easy, versatile, and always put together. This is the promise and opportunity of a capsule wardrobe—and just one more reason the movement continues to grow.

6. Iconic. Alice Gregory is a writer living in New York City. Last year, her piece for J. Crew magazine brought a new word into my reasoning for wearing a uniform. She called it “Iconic. A cheap and easy way to feel famous.” She continues, “A uniform can be a way of performing maturity or, less charitably, impersonating it. A uniform insinuates the sort of sober priorities that ossify with age, as well as a deliberate past of editing and improving.”

Alice points out that wearing the same outfit everyday is a way of asserting your status as a protagonist. “This is the reason why characters in picture books never change their clothes: Children—like adults, if they’d only admit it—crave continuity. Adopting the habit of wearing a uniform is not unstylish—this is a classification that no longer applies.”

7. Less expense. Our closets are full of clothes and shoes purchased, but rarely worn. The average American family spends $1,700 on clothes annually. Which may not seem like a lot—until you consider that most clothing purchases are not based on need at all. In 1930, the average American woman owned nine outfits. Today, that figure is 30—one for every day of the month.

Living with a capsule wardrobe or adopting an iconic uniform removes most of the waste and expense from trial-and-error clothing purchases—not to mention all the time wasted shopping for items only to return later.

8. More peace. Last month, Drew Barrymore wrote an article for Refinery 29 highlighting her new stage of life and relationship with clothes. “For starters, I’m almost 40, and the 20s clothes don’t make sense anymore. And, after two babies, the 30s clothes don’t fit anymore. I am at a clothing crossroads, and it’s a painful one at times.” To counter these feelings, Drew put herself on a closet diet limiting her wardrobe and only buying items thoughtfully. Months later, her closet is “sane and happy.” Getting dressed is no longer a battle. And her fashion sense is “now calmer and more peaceful.”

We are a society drowning in our possessions. People are looking for freedom and rescue. They are searching for new solutions. No wonder the capsule wardrobe movement continues to grow.




Maybe it is time you gave it a try. Via Becoming Minimalist 


eslie Christen OC Fashion Stylist, Orange County Fashion Stylist, Orange County Personal Shopper, Personal Shopper OC, Closet organizer In Orange County, Personal Shopper Orange County, Orange County Personal Shopping, Orange County Personal Stylist, Organizer, Personal Shopper, Personal Stylist, Orange County Stylist, Personal Stylist OC,  Leslie Christen LA Fashion Stylist, Los Angeles Fashion Stylist, Los Angeles Personal Shopper, Personal Shopper LA, Closet organizer In Los Angeles, Personal Shopper Los Angeles, Orange County Organizer, Personal Stylist LA, Personal Stylist Leslie Christen, Personal Shopper Leslie Christen, Stylist Leslie Christen, Leslie Christen, LifeStyling, Styling your life, Your life, Styled,  Leslie Christen Press, Leslie Christen, OC Style Classes, OC Style, OC Edit, OC Organize, OC Wear, Best oc Stylist, best boutiques in OC, best boutiques in Orange County, what to wear oc, where to buy oc, best blog in oc, Best fashion blog in oc, Best blogger in OC, Fashion Stylist Laguna Beach, Fashion Stylist Newport Beach, Fashion Stylist Corona Del Mar, Fashion Stylist Newport Coast




May 10, 2016

It's all in the details // Leslie's Styling Tips Featured in Desert Magazine



Desert Magazine asked and I answered! 
 Here are some of my basic styling tips and tricks that can elevate any outfit.
 Illustrated beautifully by Nicole Fay Vaisman.


ROLL ’EM UP
Mastering the “J.Crew” sleeve-roll is a must: With wrist buttons unfastened, pull the bottom of your sleeve all the way up to your elbow (or slightly above, if you have skinny arms), making sure it’s taught — this avoids bunching at the shoulder. Roll it one more time, exposing only the cuff at the top. This “French cuff” style shows more skin and looks chic.


THE SHIRT TUCK

The T-shirt tuck is the coolest trend of the moment: Hook the hem of your tee with the tip of your index finger, twist it tightly around your finger and then tuck it into the top of your jeans — just to the side of where they fasten at your waist. You can use this same method for a center tuck, which is flattering on more voluptuous body types.


With all of the buttons fastened, gather your shirt at the hem and roll it toward your belly button, and then tuck the bottom into your jeans at the center of your waist.


Here are my three favorite ways to wear a scarf, from funky to classic:

1. Take the ends, smooth the fabric and wrap it around your neck so the ends hang loose in front of your waist. (A fitted T-shirt works best underneath, and a scarf with fringe adds fun.) Next, loop a simple belt around your waist.

2. Fold the scarf in half so the ends meet and you’ve formed a loop at one side. As you wrap it around the nape of your neck, pull the loose ends through the looped side and fluff.

3. Hold your scarf at the corner and smooth it long-ways. Next, loop it around your neck so that it’s centered and the edges hang in front. Wrap one side around your neck again so that the end hangs at your chest or stomach, alongside the other end. Fluff the fabric at the loop so it appears fuller and not choker-tight.




HEM HOW-TO

The skinny jean and ankle boot trend is here to stay — for at least another season. For the most flattering proportion, the hem of your denim should fall about an inch above your bootie — stilettos, platforms, slide-sandals or slip-on sneakers — revealing a hint of skin.




Illustrations by Nicole Fay Vaisman, Desert Magazine

May 09, 2016

What Would IRIS Do?

There’s no one quite as inspiring as Iris Apfel. And putting yourself in the Iris mindset works for all sorts of situations: what would she do, what would she think, but especially, What Would Iris Say. We’ve really always wanted to find out—‘cause you know that after more than a few decades as the ultimate purveyor of extraordinary taste, the woman knows what’s up. And no surprise, there’s plenty to learn. 

— Lesson 1 —

Leave no stone unturned
(when it comes to shopping).
"[I’ve found my clothes and antiques] all over the world; I traveled extensively. For my business I used to do two trips a year, mostly to Europe and England, to buy for my clients. I had a big interior design business of my own and I also sold antiques through the Old World Weaver showrooms around the country. Then there were a number of my own things that I've collected over the years, so it's an amalgamation. But it's a long, long collection from all over the place." 

— Lesson 2 —

If you like something, buy it.
"It has to jump out and say something. I like offbeat things; I have very few run-of-the-mill things. I have a lot of pieces that are from other periods that may fit perfectly, but are not the usual thing that you would see. You can't do houses and have everything you need right at your fingertips, and clients don't like to wait too long. So whenever I saw unusual things I bought them—in all kinds of crazy places.
I've had to cut down drastically as I’ve run out of wall space. Fortunately, I'm not a minimalist, as I'm sure you've noticed. I have a couple of storage spaces. I still buy small things that appeal to me and I still collect jewelry with a vengeance.”

— Lesson 3 —

Every purchase should be special.
"I just bought a wonderful pin recently; it's all pavĂ© stones and must be about eight inches high. When you look at it at first it looks like a 19th century dandy. The gentleman has a long frock coat and interesting hat, like a top hat, but it's a trembling piece—its head wiggles. When you look more however, he's not a man, he's a monkey. He's really quite wonderful."

— Lesson 4 —

Make a statement with your beauty choices
"My favorite shade of lipstick? Very, very, bright, bright, bright red. My husband and I used the same scent, it's very nice but not easy to find. We used to buy it in Paris, but now you can get it in the States. It’s called Yagatan [cologne]." 

— Lesson 5 —

When you find something you love, make it your own.
"I found [my signature glasses] at a flea market and I started to wear them when I needed to wear glasses! As a matter of fact, I liked them so much—the great big ones—sometimes I’d wear them without any lenses, just as an accessory, as I thought they were so fantastic."

— Lesson 6 —

Save the meaningful pieces forever
"I still have the dress I wore on the first date with my husband, which was more than 66 years ago. I still have it and it still fits.” 

— Lesson 7 —

Keep an open mind

"There were a few decades that I hated, but I loved most things. The world is not black and white; there are lots of shades of grey. There are good things and bad things in every era, and I think it's kind of very blindfolded to say one era was wonderful, as it was wonderful, but there were a lot of bad things as well. Art Nouveau I don't like, but people were doing some wonderful things. I love things with a sense of Baroque. I love big, bold things, as well as very simple things. I go from one to the other and I like to mix them up.
I don’t have special places to shop, as you never know what you're going to find—I always tried to keep an open mind. I could find a treasure in a junk shop or junk in a very elegant emporium."

— Lesson 8 —

Don’t expect anything from anybody
"My father told me once not to expect anything from anybody so I wouldn't be disappointed. If somebody was nice and did nice things for me I should be overjoyed, but I shouldn't go through life expecting it, which is very good advice." 

— Lesson 9 —

Let your personality shine through
"It's very eclectic—everything I like, I put together. I don't like the norm. I think there's a lot of wonderful decorating around, but it all looks the same. While some of these homes are very beautiful, they look anonymous to me. They could be suites in very expensive hotels, but they don't tell you who lives there. I like an apartment that has some personality. When it comes down to it, everyone is different."

— Lesson 10 —

Express yourself
"The anonymity of it—it's all too similar. I think people should express themselves more and not just buy what's in. While it can be very beautiful and it may suit you perfectly, I'm sure it doesn’t suit everyone in the same way. I like people who express themselves and are more individualistic."



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